Geometry

The point is one of the the most basic concepts in geometry. It takes up a defined position on a plane surface. To get anywhere, whether it’s a graph, a city, a goal, or in life, you must go from one point to another point.

Say you’re sitting down in your room as I am sitting now. Think of a place that you want to go to (a tangible one, please. We’re not ready to deal with concepts like heaven or happiness yet).

For example, imagine you have to meet a friend at a cafe located 5 blocks away, and you have to be there in 15 minutes. Drawing a straight line between you and that cafe is the fastest and shortest distance that you could travel. Assuming that taking that straight line could get you to the cafe in 5 minutes, you’ll still have 10 minutes to spare. Hooray for you!

This is a map that has  absolutely nothing to do with what I'm talking about.

This is a map that has absolutely nothing to do with what I’m talking about.

Unfortunately, reality is not like that at all. Most of the time, we don’t have that option to take the straight line. This is what could happen in reality:

You set out to walk to the cafe. You don’t take the straight line because there are walls and buildings in the way. You have to go around an entire block because there is some construction going on where, for some reason, pedestrians aren’t allowed to pass by. Halfway through, you realize you forgot your wallet at home, so you rush back to get it. You get your wallet. You break into a weird, half-walk, half-run, forgetting about traffic regulations because you were in such a hurry. A policeman catches and fines you for jaywalking. You arrive at the cafe 15 minutes late.

Yup, that my friends, is life. There are so many twists and turns and circles everywhere, it’s almost like straight lines don’t exist (and if they do, they’re blurry). It doesn’t seem so comforting when you think about it, but that’s what makes life interesting.

You never know what to expect when you turn around a corner, and that’s fine. The next point you need to reach may not be so clear, and the path may be obscured by smoke and fog, and that’s fine too. I believe the smog and dust will settle, and as you progress, you will learn to fan out the fog.

From here on I’m going to keep this in mind: there is little adventure in taking perfect, straight lines. Deviations from the straight line open you up to experiences you would never have encountered; they help you discover new things, new people, and most importantly, yourself. Just as Ellie from the movie “Up” would say, “adventure is out there!”